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    william edward hartpole lecky Quotes

    The doctrine of a material hell in its effect was to chill and deaden the sympathies, predispose men to inflict suffering, and to retard the march of civilization.
    — William Edward Hartpole Lecky
    Spain and southern Italy, in which Catholicism has most deeply implanted its roots, are even now, probably beyond all other countries in Europe, those in which inhumanity to animals is most wanton and unrebuked.
    — William Edward Hartpole Lecky
    tags: animals 
     
    All history shows that, in exact proportion as nations advance in civilisation, the accounts of miracles taking place among them become rarer and rarer, until at last they entirely cease.
    — William Edward Hartpole Lecky
    tags: miracle 
     
    Whenever the clergy were at the elbow of the civil arm, no matter whether they were Catholic or Protestant, persecution was the result.
    — William Edward Hartpole Lecky
    There have certainly been many periods in history when virtue was more rare than under the Caesars; but there has probably never been a period when vice was more extravagant or uncontrolled.
    — William Edward Hartpole Lecky
    tags: virtue 
     
    Highly graduate taxation realizes most completely the supreme danger of democracy, creating a state of things in which one class imposes on another burdens which it is not asked to share, and impels the State into vast schemes of extravagance, under the belief that the whole costs will be thrown upon others.
    — William Edward Hartpole Lecky
    Fierce invectives against women form a conspicuous and grotesque portion of the writings of the Church fathers.
    — William Edward Hartpole Lecky
    tags: women  church  writing  father 
     
    The contraction of theological influence has been at once the best measure, and the essential condition of intellectual advance.
    — William Edward Hartpole Lecky
    tags: influence 
     
    There is no possible line of conduct which has at some time and place been condemned, and which has not at some other time and place been enjoined as a duty.
    — William Edward Hartpole Lecky
    tags: time 
     
    The morals of men are more governed by their pursuits than by their opinions. A type of virtue is first formed by circumstances, and men afterwards make it the model upon which their theories are framed.
    — William Edward Hartpole Lecky
    tags: men  virtue  opinion  morals 
     
    Abortion... was probably regarded by the average Roman of the later days of Paganism much as Englishmen in the last century regarded convivial excesses, as certainly wrong, but so venial as scarcely to deserve censure.
    — William Edward Hartpole Lecky
    tags: wrong 
     
    It had been boldly predicted by some of the early Christians that the conversion of the world would lead to the establishment of perpetual peace. In looking back, with our present experience, we are driven to the melancholy conclusion that, instead of diminishing the number of wars, ecclesiastical influence has actually and very seriously increased it.
    — William Edward Hartpole Lecky
    The Augustinian doctrine of the damnation of unbaptized infants and the Calvinistic doctrine of reprobation . . . surpass in atrocity any tenets that have ever been admitted into any pagan creed.
    — William Edward Hartpole Lecky
    When the Church obtained the direction of the civil power, she soon modified or abandoned the tolerant maxims she had formerly inculcated; and, in the course of a few years, restrictive laws were enacted, both against the Jews and against the heretics.
    — William Edward Hartpole Lecky
    tags: power  law  church  year 
     
    The moral duty to be expected in different ages is not a unity of standard, or of acts, but a unity of tendency ... At one time the benevolent affections embrace merely the family, soon the circle expanding includes first a class, then a nation, then a coalition of nations, then all humanity and finally, its influence is felt in the dealings of man with the animal world.
    — William Edward Hartpole Lecky
    In proportion to its power, Protestantism has been as persecuting as Catholicism.
    — William Edward Hartpole Lecky
    tags: power 
     
    One of the most important lessons that experience teaches is that, on the whole, success depends more upon character than upon either intellect or fortune.
    — William Edward Hartpole Lecky
    Routine shortens and variety lengthens time, and it is therefore in the power of men to do something to regulate its pace. A life with many landmarks, a life which is much subdivided when those subdivisions are not of the same kind, and when new and diverse interests, impressions, and labours follow each other in swift and distinct successions, seems the most long.
    — William Edward Hartpole Lecky
    tags: time  men  power 
     
    Anxiety and Ennui are the Scylla and Charybdis on which the bark of human happiness is most often wrecked.
    — William Edward Hartpole Lecky
    tags: happiness  human  anxiety 
     
    The unweary, unostentatious, and inglorious crusade of England against slavery may probably be regarded as among the three or four perfectly virtuous pages comprised in the history of nations.
    — William Edward Hartpole Lecky
    tags: slavery  england 
     
    Passions weaken, but habits strengthen, with age, and it is the great task of youth to set the current of habit and to form the tastes which are most productive of happiness in life.
    — William Edward Hartpole Lecky
    tags: happiness  youth  age  passion 
     
    The simple record of these three short years of active life has done more to regenerate and soften mankind than all the discourses of philosophers and all the exhortations of moralists.
    — William Edward Hartpole Lecky
    There are times in the lives of most of us, when we would have given all the world to be as we were but yesterday, though that yesterday had passed over us unappreciated and unenjoyed.
    — William Edward Hartpole Lecky
    tags: time  live  world 
     
    Almost all Europe, for many centuries, was inundated with blood, which was shed at the direct instigation or with the full approval of the ecclesiastical authorities.
    — William Edward Hartpole Lecky
    tags: authority  blood 
     
    Faith always presented to the mind the idea of an abnormal intellectual condition, of the subversion or suspension of the critical faculties. It sometimes comprised more than this, but it always included this. It was the opposite of doubt and of the spirit of doubt. What irreverent men called credulity, reverent men called faith; and although one word was more respectful than the other, yet the two words were with most men strictly synonymous.
    — William Edward Hartpole Lecky
    tags: men  doubt  faith  mind  spirit  ideas 
     
    Terror is everywhere the beginning of religion.
    — William Edward Hartpole Lecky
    Making every allowance for the errors of the most extreme fallibility, the history of Catholicism would on this hypothesis represent an amount of imposture probably unequaled in the annals of the human race.
    — William Edward Hartpole Lecky
    tags: human  race  extreme 
     
    There is no wild beast so ferocious as Christians who differ concerning their faith.
    — William Edward Hartpole Lecky
    tags: wild  christian  faith 
     
    Pleasures that are in themselves innocent lose their power of pleasing if they become the sole or main object of pursuit.
    — William Edward Hartpole Lecky
    tags: power  pleasure 
     
    There are some poisons which, before they kill men, allay pain and diffuse a soothing sensation through the frame. We may recognize the hour of enjoyment they procure, but we must not separate it from the price at which it was purchased.
    — William Edward Hartpole Lecky
    tags: men  pain 
     
    I venture to maintain that there are multitudes to whom the necessity of discharging the duties of a butcher would be so inexpressibly painful and revolting, that if they could obtain a flesh diet on no other condition, they would relinquish it forever.
    — William Edward Hartpole Lecky
    tags: forever 
     
    The animal world being altogether external to the scheme of redemption, was regarded as beyond the range of duty, and the belief that we have any kind of obligation to its members has never been inculcated - has never, I believe, been even admitted - by Catholic theologians.
    — William Edward Hartpole Lecky
    tags: animals  belief  world  believe 
     
    Physical science has taught us to associate Deity with the normal rather than with the abnormal.
    — William Edward Hartpole Lecky
    Whence has come thy lasting power.
    — William Edward Hartpole Lecky
    tags: power 
     
    When it began, Christianity was regarded as a system entirely beyond the range and scope of human reason; it was impious to question; it was impious to examine; it was impious to discriminate. On the other hand, it was visibly instinct with the supernatural. Miracles of every order and degree of magnitude were flashing forth incessantly from all its parts.
    — William Edward Hartpole Lecky
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