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    mary wortley montagu Quotes

    Nobody can deny but religion is a comfort to the distressed, a cordial to the sick, and sometimes a restraint on the wicked.
    — Mary Wortley Montagu
    tags: comfort 
     
    And we meet, with champagne and a chicken, at last.
    — Mary Wortley Montagu
    A face is too slight a foundation for happiness.
    — Mary Wortley Montagu
    tags: happiness 
     
    But the fruit that can fall without shaking Indeed is too mellow for me.
    — Mary Wortley Montagu
    In short I will part with anything for you but you.
    — Mary Wortley Montagu
    Whatever is clearly expressed is well wrote.
    — Mary Wortley Montagu
    Copiousness of words, however ranged, is always false eloquence, though it will ever impose on some sort of understandings.
    — Mary Wortley Montagu
    It's in no way my interest (according to the common acceptance of that word) to convince the world of their errors; that is, I shall get nothing from it but the private satisfaction of having done good to mankind, and I know nobody that reckons that satisfaction any part of their interest.
    — Mary Wortley Montagu
    Solitude begets whimsies.
    — Mary Wortley Montagu
    tags: solitude 
     
    Miserable is the fate of writers: if they are agreeable, they are offensive; and if dull, they starve.
    — Mary Wortley Montagu
    tags: fate 
     
    People are never so near playing the fool as when they think themselves wise.
    — Mary Wortley Montagu
    tags: people  wise  fools 
     
    While conscience is our friend, all is at peace; however once it is offended, farewell to a tranquil mind.
    — Mary Wortley Montagu
    tags: friends  conscience  mind 
     
    Whoever will cultivate their own mind will find full employment. Every virtue does not only require great care in the planting, but as much daily solicitude in cherishing as exotic fruits and flowers; the vices and passions (which I am afraid are the natural product of the soil) demand perpetual weeding. Add to this the search after knowledge. . . and the longest life is too short.
    — Mary Wortley Montagu
    tags: virtue  care  mind  passion  afraid 
     
    People wish their enemies dead - but I do not; I say give them the gout, give them the stone!
    — Mary Wortley Montagu
    tags: enemies  people  wishes  enemy 
     
    My chief study all my life has been to lighten misfortunes and multiply pleasures, as far as human nature can.
    — Mary Wortley Montagu
    tags: nature  human  pleasure 
     
    We are no more free agents than the queen of clubs when she victoriously takes prisoner the knave of hearts.
    — Mary Wortley Montagu
    tags: heart 
     
    I prefer liberty to chains of diamonds.
    — Mary Wortley Montagu
    tags: liberty  diamond 
     
    There is no remedy so easy as books, which if they do not give cheerfulness, at least restore quiet to the most troubled mind.
    — Mary Wortley Montagu
    tags: mind  book 
     
    Take back the beauty and wit you bestow upon me; leave me my own mediocrity of agreeableness and genius, but leave me also my sincerity, my constancy, and my plain dealing; 'Tis all I have to recommend me to the esteem either of others or myself.
    — Mary Wortley Montagu
    tags: beauty  genius 
     
    It was formerly a terrifying view to me that I should one day be an old woman. I now find that Nature has provided pleasures for every state.
    — Mary Wortley Montagu
    tags: nature  women  pleasure 
     
    I am afraid we are little better than straws upon the water; we may flatter ourselves that we swim, when the current carries us along.
    — Mary Wortley Montagu
    tags: afraid 
     
    Civility costs nothing, and buys everything.
    — Mary Wortley Montagu
    [On her political writings:] It is, I confess, very possible that these my Labours may only be destined to line Trunks, or preserve roast Meat from too fierce a Fire; yet in that Shape I shall be useful to my Country.
    — Mary Wortley Montagu
    tags: political 
     
    How many thousands ... earnestly seeking what they do not want, while they neglect the real blessings in their possession - I mean the innocent gratification of their senses, which is all we can properly call our own.
    — Mary Wortley Montagu
    tags: blessing  real  neglect 
     
    Civility cost nothing.
    — Mary Wortley Montagu
    Only a mother knows a mother's fondness.
    — Mary Wortley Montagu
    tags: mother 
     
    Muse, time has taught me that all metaphysical systems, even historical facts given as truths, are hardly that, so I amuse myself with more agreeable lies; I no longer read anything but novels.
    — Mary Wortley Montagu
    tags: time  truth  facts  novel  read  historical 
     
    Lord Bacon makes beauty to consist of grace and motion.
    — Mary Wortley Montagu
    tags: beauty  grace 
     
    Gardening is certainly the next amusement to reading.
    — Mary Wortley Montagu
    tags: reading  amusement 
     
    Begin nothing without considering what the end may be.
    — Mary Wortley Montagu
    The pious farmer, who ne'er misses pray'rs, With patience suffers unexpected rain; He blesses Heav'n for what its bounty spares, And sees, resign'd, a crop of blighted grain. But, spite of sermons, farmers would blaspheme, If a star fell to set their thatch on flame.
    — Mary Wortley Montagu
    tags: patience  star 
     
    The screech-owl, with ill-boding cry, Portends strange things, old women say; Stops every fool that passes by, And frights the school-boy from his play.
    — Mary Wortley Montagu
    tags: women  fools 
     
    one would suffer a great deal to be happy.
    — Mary Wortley Montagu
    Conscience is justice's best minister; it threatens, promises, rewards, and punishes and keeps all under control; the busy must attend to its remonstrances, the most powerful submit to its reproof, and the angry endure its upbraidings. While conscience is our friend all is peace; but if once offended farewell the tranquil mind.
    — Mary Wortley Montagu
    We have all our playthings. Happy are they who are contented with those they can obtain; those hours are spent in the wisest manner that can easiest shade the ills of life, and are the least productive of ill consequences.
    — Mary Wortley Montagu
    tags: consequence 
     
    See how that pair of billing doves With open murmurs own their loves And, heedless of censorious eyes, Pursue their unpolluted joys: No fears of future want molest The downy quiet of their nest.
    — Mary Wortley Montagu
    tags: fear  future  eyes 
     
    Remember my unalterable maxim, "When we love, we always have something to say.
    — Mary Wortley Montagu
    The most romantic region of every country is that where the mountains unite themselves with the plains or lowlands.
    — Mary Wortley Montagu
    tags: romantic 
     
    As I approach a second childhood, I endeavor to enter into the pleasures of it.
    — Mary Wortley Montagu
    It's all been very interesting.
    — Mary Wortley Montagu
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