herman melville Quotes

Are not half our lives spent in reproaches for foregone actions, of the true nature and consequences of which we were wholly ignorant at the time?
tags: nature live action true consequence
— Herman Melville
Madman! Look through my eyes if thou hast none of thine own.
tags: eyes
— Herman Melville
So, when on one side you hoist in Locke's head, you go over that way; but now, on the other side, hoist in Kant's and you come back again; but in very poor plight. Thus, some minds for ever keep trimming boat. Oh, ye foolish! throw all these thunder-heads overboard, and then you will float light and right.
tags: right poor mind
— Herman Melville
For God's sake, be economical with your lamps and candles! not a gallon you burn, but at least one drop of man's blood was spilled for it.
tags: blood god
— Herman Melville
To a sensitive being, pity is not seldom pain.
tags: pain
— Herman Melville
But the might-have-been is but boggy ground to build upon.
— Herman Melville
My body is but the lees of my better being.
tags: body
— Herman Melville
But as in landlessness alone resides the highest truth, shoreless, indefinite as God - so better is it to perish in that howling infinite, than be ingloriously dashed upon the lee, even if that were safety! For worm-like, then, oh! who would craven crawl to land!
tags: truth alone god
— Herman Melville
Aye, aye! and I'll chase him round Good Hope, and round the Horn, and round the Norway Maelstrom, and round perdition's flames before I give him up.
tags: hope
— Herman Melville
A good laugh is a mighty good thing, and rather too scarce a good thing; the more's the pity. So, if any one man, in his own proper person, afford stuff for a good joke to anybody, let him not be backward, but let him cheerfully allow himself to spend and be spent in that way. And the man that has anything bountifully laughable about him, be sure there is more in that man than you perhaps think for.
tags: men people
— Herman Melville
But even so, amid the tornadoed Atlantic of my being, do I myself still for ever centrally disport in mute calm; and while ponderous planets of unwaning woe revolve round me, deep down and deep inland there I still bathe me in eternal mildness of joy.
tags: joy
— Herman Melville
The Past is the textbook of tyrants; the Future is the Bible of the Free.
tags: future past bible
— Herman Melville
I am a man who, from his youth upwards, has been filled with a profound conviction that the easiest way of life is the best.
tags: men youth
— Herman Melville
I would prefer not to.
— Herman Melville
Thou wine art the friend of the friendless, though a foe to all.
tags: friends
— Herman Melville
Thus it often is, that the constant friction of illiberal minds wears out at last the best resolves of the more generous.
tags: mind
— Herman Melville
Struck dead by an angel of God! Yet the angel must hang!
tags: angel
— Herman Melville
The drama's done. Why then here does any one step forth? - Because one did survive the wreck.
— Herman Melville
In time of peril, like the needle to the loadstone, obedience, irrespective of rank, generally flies to him who is best fitted to command.
tags: time
— Herman Melville
It is-or seems to be-a wise sort of thing, to realise that all that happens to a man in this life is only by way of joke, especially his misfortunes, if he have them. And it is also worth bearing in mind, that the joke is passed round pretty liberally & impartially, so that not very many are entitled to fancy that they in particular are getting the worst of it.
tags: men wise mind worth
— Herman Melville
Implacable I, the implacable Sea; Implacable most when most I smile serene- Pleased, not appeased, by myriad wrecks in me.
tags: smile
— Herman Melville
Man, in the ideal, is so noble and so sparkling, such a grand and glowing creature, that over any ignominious blemish in him all his fellows should run to throw their costliest robes.
tags: men noble
— Herman Melville
Nothing may help or heal While Amor incensed remembers wrong.
tags: help wrong
— Herman Melville
Amity itself can only be maintained by reciprocal respect, and true friends are punctilious equals.
tags: friends respect true
— Herman Melville
The terrors of truth and dart of death To faith alike are vain.
tags: death truth faith
— Herman Melville
To treat of human actions is to deal wholly with second causes.
tags: action human
— Herman Melville
Everyone knows that in most people's estimation, to do anything cooly is to do it genteelly.
— Herman Melville
Toil is man's allotment; toil of brain, or toil of hands, or a grief that's more than either, the grief and sin of idleness.
tags: grief brain sin
— Herman Melville
Give me a condor's quill! Give me Vesuvius crater for an inkstand!
— Herman Melville
Stripped of the cunning artifices of the tailor, and standing forth in the garb of Eden - what a sorry set of round-shouldered, spindle-shanked, crane-necked varlets would civilized men appear!
tags: men sorry
— Herman Melville
Many sensible things banished from high life find an asylum among the mob.
— Herman Melville
See how elastic our prejudices grow when once love comes to bend them.
tags: prejudice
— Herman Melville
Ah, Bartleby! Ah, humanity!
— Herman Melville
We cannibals must help these Christians.
tags: help christian
— Herman Melville
Doesn't the devil live forever; who ever heard that the devil was dead? Did you ever see any person wearing mourning for the devil?
tags: people live devil
— Herman Melville
Thou saw'st the locked lovers when leaping from their flaming ship; heart to heart they sank beneath the exulting wave; true to each other, when heaven seemed false to them.
tags: heart true lover heaven
— Herman Melville
Think not, is my eleventh commandment; and sleep when you can, is my twelfth.
tags: sleep
— Herman Melville
Top-heavy was the ship as a dinnerless student with all Aristotle in his head.
— Herman Melville
Who in the rainbow can draw the line where the violet tint ends and the orange tint begins?
— Herman Melville
A true military officer is in one particular like a true monk. Not with more self-abnegation will the latter keep his vows of monastic obedience than the former his vows of allegiance to martial duty.
tags: true military
— Herman Melville
herman melville
Birth    : August 1, 1819
Death  : September 28, 1891
Occupation  : Novelist