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    george washington Quotes

    The very idea of the power and the right of the people to establish government presupposes the duty of every individual to obey the established government.
    — George Washington
    Sympathy for the favorite nation, facilitating the illusion of an imaginary common interest in cases where no real common interest exists, and infusing into one the enmities of the other, betrays the former into a participation in the quarrels and wars of the latter without adequate inducement or justification.
    — George Washington
    tags: illusion  real  war 
     
    There exists in the economy and course of nature, an indissoluble union between virtue and happiness; between duty and advantage; between the genuine maxims of an honest and magnanimous policy, and the solid rewards of public prosperity and felicity; since we ought to be no less persuaded that the propitious smiles of Heaven can never be expected on a nation that disregards the eternal rules of order and right, which Heaven itself has ordained.
    — George Washington
    tags: nature  smile  right  virtue  rules  heaven 
     
    Democratical States must always feel before they can see: it is this that makes their Governments slow, but the people will be right at last.
    — George Washington
    tags: people  right  government 
     
    I wish to walk in such a line as will give most general satisfaction.
    — George Washington
    tags: wishes 
     
    If you can't send money, send tobacco.
    — George Washington
    tags: money 
     
    I heard the bullets whistle- and believe me, there is something charming in the sound.
    — George Washington
    tags: believe 
     
    Let no one go hungry away. If any of the kind of people should be in want of corn, supply their necessities, provided it does not encourage them in idleness.
    — George Washington
    tags: people  encourage 
     
    The thing that separates the American Christian from every other person on earth is the fact that he would rather die on his feet, than to live on his knees.
    — George Washington
    If the minority, and a small one too, is suffered to dictate to the majority, after measures have undergone the most solemn discussions by the representatives of the people, and their will through this medium is enacted into a law, there can be no security for life, liberty, or property; nor, if the laws are not to govern, can any man know how to conduct himself in safety.
    — George Washington
    tags: men  people  law  media  liberty  majority 
     
    We should not look back unless it is to derive useful lessons from past errors, and for the purpose of profiting by dearly bought experience.
    — George Washington
    tags: lessons  past  experience 
     
    It will be found an unjust and unwise jealousy to deprive a man of his natural liberty upon the supposition he may abuse it.
    — George Washington
    tags: men  abuse  jealousy  liberty 
     
    There is no practice more dangerous than that of borrowing money; for when money can be had in this way, repayment is seldom thought of in time, the interest becomes a loss, exertions to raise it by dent of industry cease, it comes easy and is spent freely, and many things (are) indulged in that would never be thought of if (they were) to be purchased by the sweat of the brow.
    — George Washington
    tags: time  thoughts  loss  money  dangerous 
     
    And you will, by the dignity of your Conduct, afford occasion for Posterity to say, when speaking of the glorious example you have exhibited to Mankind, had this day been wanting, the World had never seen the last stage of perfection to which human nature is capable of attaining.
    — George Washington
    The wishes of the people, seldom founded in deep disquisitions, or resulting from other reasonings than their present feelings, may not entirely accord with our true policy and interest. If they do not, to observe a proper line of conduct for promoting the one, and avoiding offence to the other, will be a work of great difficulty.
    — George Washington
    tags: people  work  present  true  wishes 
     
    Labor to keep alive in your breast that little spark of celestial fire, called conscience.
    — George Washington
    tags: fire  conscience 
     
    Bad seed is a robbery of the worst kind: for your pocket-book not only suffers by it, but your preparations are lost and a season passes away unimproved.
    — George Washington
    tags: lost  bad 
     
    Indians and wolves are both beasts of prey, tho' they differ in shape.
    — George Washington
    Make the most of the Indian Hemp Seed and sow it everywhere.
    — George Washington
    Refrain from drink which is the source of all evil-and the ruin of half the workmen in this Country.
    — George Washington
    The marvel of all history is the patience with which men and women submit to burdens unnecessarily laid upon them by their governments.
    — George Washington
    It should be the highest ambition of every American to extend his views beyond himself, and to bear in mind that his conduct will not only affect himself, his country, and his immediate posterity; but that its influence may be co-extensive with the world, and stamp political happiness or misery on ages yet unborn.
    — George Washington
    May the children of the stock of Abraham who dwell in this land continue to merit and enjoy the good will of the other inhabitants-while every one shall sit in safety under his own vine and fig tree and there shall be none to make him afraid. May the father of all mercies scatter light, and not darkness, upon our paths, and make us all in our several vocations useful here, and in His own due time and way everlastingly happy.
    — George Washington
    To please everybody is impossible; were I to undertake it, I should probably please nobody.
    — George Washington
    The best means of forming a manly, virtuous, and happy people will be found in the right education of youth. Without this foundation, every other means, in my opinion, must fail.
    — George Washington
    `Tis substantially true, that virtue or morality is a necessary spring of popular government. The rule indeed extends with more or less force to every species of free Government.
    — George Washington
    To place any dependence upon militia is assuredly resting upon a broken staff. Men just dragged from the tender scenes of domestic life, unaccustomed to the din of arms, totally unacquainted with every kind of military skill ... makes them timid and ready to fly from their own shadows.
    — George Washington
    tags: men  broken  military 
     
    No compact among men . . . can be pronounced everlasting and inviolable, and if I may so express myself, that no Wall of words, that no mound of parchment can be so formed as to stand against the sweeping torrent of boundless ambition on the one side, aided by the sapping current of corrupted morals on the other.
    — George Washington
    tags: men  ambition  morals 
     
    It is too probable that no plan we propose will be adopted. Perhaps another dreadful conflict is to be sustained. If, to please the people, we offer what we ourselves disprove, how can we afterwards defend our work? Let us raise a standard to which the wise and the honest can repair. The event is in the hand of God.
    — George Washington
    tags: people  conflict  god  wise  standard 
     
    It is on great occasions only, and after time has been given for cool and deliberate reflection, that the real voice of the people can be known.
    — George Washington
    The necessity of reciprocal checks in the exercise of political power, by dividing and distributing it into different depositories, and constituting each the guardian of the public weal against invasions by the others, has been evinced by experiments ancient and modern, some of them in our country and under our own eyes.
    — George Washington
    Let us therefore animate and encourage each other, and show the whole world that a Freeman, contending for liberty on his own ground, is superior to any slavish mercenary on earth.
    — George Washington
    For if Men are to be precluded from offering their Sentiments on a matter, which may involve the most serious and alarming consequences, that can invite the consideration of Mankind, reason is of no use to us; the freedom of Speech may be taken away, and dumb and silent we may be led, like sheep, to the Slaughter.
    — George Washington
    No man has a more perfect reliance on the alwise and powerful dispensations of the Supreme Being than I have, nor thinks His aid more necessary.
    — George Washington
    tags: men  powerful 
     
    I never have to grope for methods. The method is revealed at the moment I am inspired to create something new. Without God to draw aside the curtain I would be helpless.
    — George Washington
    tags: moment  god 
     
    It was not my intention to doubt that, the Doctrines of the Illuminati, and principles of Jacobinism had not spread in the United States. On the contrary, no one is more truly satisfied of this fact than I am.
    — George Washington
    tags: doubt  facts 
     
    When once the woman has tempted us, and we have tasted the forbidden fruit, there is no such thing as checking our appetites, whatever the consequences may be.
    — George Washington
    Human rights can only be assured among a virtuous people. The general government . . . can never be in danger of degenerating into a monarchy, an oligarchy, an aristocracy, or any despotic or oppresive form so long as there is any virtue in the body of the people.
    — George Washington
    Reason and experience both forbid us to expect that national morality can exist apart from religious principle.
    — George Washington
    Remember, officers and soldiers, that you are fighting for the blessings of liberty.
    — George Washington
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    george washington
    Birth    : February 22, 1732
    Death  : December 14, 1799
    Occupation  : 1st U.S. President

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