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    geoffrey chaucer Quotes

    A yokel mind loves stories from of old, Being the kind it can repeat and hold.
    — Geoffrey Chaucer
    tags: mind  stories 
     
    Great peace is found in little busy-ness.
    — Geoffrey Chaucer
    tags: peace 
     
    I wol yow telle, as was me taught also,The foure spirites and the bodies sevene,By ordre, as ofte I herde my lord hem nevene.The firste spirit quiksilver called is,The second orpiment, the thridde, ywis,Sal armoniak, and the firthe brimstoon.The bodies sevene eek, lo! hem heer anoon:Sol gold is, and Luna silver we threpe,Mars yron, Mercurie quiksilver we clepe,Saturnus leed, and Jupiter is tin,And Venus coper, by my fader kin!
    — Geoffrey Chaucer
    tags: body  spirit 
     
    Thou shalt make castels thanne in Spayne And dreme of joye, all but in vayne.
    — Geoffrey Chaucer
    Mercy surpasses justice.
    — Geoffrey Chaucer
    tags: justice  mercy 
     
    He who accepts his poverty unhurt I'd say is rich although he lacked a shirt. But truly poor are they who whine and fret and covet what they cannot hope to get.
    — Geoffrey Chaucer
    tags: poverty  poor  hope 
     
    In the stars is written the death of every man.
    — Geoffrey Chaucer
    tags: death  men  star 
     
    Woe to the cook whose sauce has no sting.
    — Geoffrey Chaucer
    In April the sweet showers fall And pierce the drought of March to the root, and all The veins are bathed in liquor of such power As brings about the engendering of the flower.
    — Geoffrey Chaucer
    tags: power  flowers  april 
     
    Truth is the highest thing that man may keep.
    — Geoffrey Chaucer
    tags: truth  men 
     
    The guilty think all talk is of themselves.
    — Geoffrey Chaucer
    Time and tide wait for no man.
    — Geoffrey Chaucer
    tags: time  men 
     
    Many small make a great.
    — Geoffrey Chaucer
    Patience is a conquering virtue. The learned say that, if it not desert you, It vanquishes what force can never reach; Why answer back at every angry speech? No, learn forbearance or, I'll tell you what, You will be taught it, whether you will or not.
    — Geoffrey Chaucer
    tags: patience  virtue  learn 
     
    Women desire six things: They want their husbands to be brave, wise, rich, generous, obedient to wife, and lively in bed.
    — Geoffrey Chaucer
    tags: desires  women  wise  wife 
     
    The devil can only destroy those who are already on their way to damnation.
    — Geoffrey Chaucer
    tags: devil 
     
    How potent is the fancy! People are so impressionable, they can die of imagination.
    — Geoffrey Chaucer
    tags: people  die  imagination 
     
    All good things must come to an end.
    — Geoffrey Chaucer
    The life so brief, the art so long in the learning, the attempt so hard, the conquest so sharp, the fearful joy that ever slips away so quickly - by all this I mean love, which so sorely astounds my feeling with its wondrous operation, that when I think upon it I scarce know whether I wake or sleep.
    — Geoffrey Chaucer
    tags: joy  sleep  learning 
     
    What is better than wisdom? Woman. And what is better than a good woman? Nothing.
    — Geoffrey Chaucer
    tags: women 
     
    Every honest miller has a golden thumb.
    — Geoffrey Chaucer
    He loved chivalrye Trouthe and honour, freedom and curteisye.
    — Geoffrey Chaucer
    tags: freedom 
     
    Certes, they been lye to hounds, for an hound when he cometh by the roses, or by other bushes, though he may nat pisse, yet wole he heve up his leg and make a countenance to pisse.
    — Geoffrey Chaucer
    If love be good, from whence cometh my woe?
    — Geoffrey Chaucer
    For out of old fields, as men saith, Cometh all this new corn from year to year; And out of old books, in good faith, Cometh all this new science that men learn.
    — Geoffrey Chaucer
    tags: men  faith  learn  book  year 
     
    The Iyf so short, the craft so long to lerne, Thassay so hard, so sharp the conquenng. . . . . For out of olde feldes, as men seith, Cometh al this newe corn fro yeer to yere; And out of olde bokes, in good feith, Cometh al this newe science that men lere.
    — Geoffrey Chaucer
    tags: men  craft 
     
    One flesh they are; and one flesh, so I'd guess, Has but one heart, come grief or happiness.
    — Geoffrey Chaucer
    tags: happiness  heart  grief 
     
    Fo lo, the gentil kind of the lioun! For when a flye offendeth him or byteth, He with his tayl awey the flye smyteth Al esily, for, of his genterye, Him deyneth net to wreke him on a flye, As cloth a curre or elles another beste.
    — Geoffrey Chaucer
    Hard is the heart that loveth nought In May.
    — Geoffrey Chaucer
    tags: heart 
     
    And gladly wolde he lerne, and gladly teche.
    — Geoffrey Chaucer
    Abstinence is approved of God.
    — Geoffrey Chaucer
    tags: god 
     
    By God, if women had written stories, As clerks had within here oratories, They would have written of men more wickedness Than all the mark of Adam may redress.
    — Geoffrey Chaucer
    tags: men  women  god  stories  adam 
     
    Go, little booke! go, my little tragedie!
    — Geoffrey Chaucer
    The greatest scholars are not usually the wisest people.
    — Geoffrey Chaucer
    tags: people 
     
    Forbid us something, and that thing we desire.
    — Geoffrey Chaucer
    tags: desires 
     
    One cannot be avenged for every wrong; according to the occasion, everyone who knows how, must use temperance.
    — Geoffrey Chaucer
    tags: occasion 
     
    This world nys but a thurghfare ful of wo, And we been pilgrymes, passynge to and fro.
    — Geoffrey Chaucer
    tags: world 
     
    There was the murdered corpse, in covert laid,And violent death in thousand shapes displayed;The city to the soldier's rage resigned;Successless wars, and poverty behind;Ships burnt in fight, or forced on rocky shores,And the rash hunter strangled by the boars;The newborn babe by nurses overlaid;And the cook caught within the raging fire he made.
    — Geoffrey Chaucer
    tags: death  poverty  fire  fight  war  violent 
     
    Whan that Aprill with his shoures sooteThe droghte of March hath perced to the roote.
    — Geoffrey Chaucer
    Who looks at me, beholdeth sorrows all, All pain, all torture, woe and all distress; I have no need on other harms to call, As anguish, languor, cruel bitterness, Discomfort, dread, and madness more and less; Methinks from heaven above the tears must rain In pity for my harsh and cruel pain.
    — Geoffrey Chaucer
    tags: pain  sorrow  madness  tears  rain  heaven 
     
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