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    claude bernard Quotes

    Ardent desire for knowledge, in fact, is the one motive attracting and supporting investigators in their efforts; and just this knowledge, really grasped and yet always flying before them, becomes at once their sole torment and their sole happiness. Those who do not know the torment of the unknown cannot have the joy of discovery which is certainly the liveliest that the mind of man can ever feel.
    — Claude Bernard
    True science teaches us to doubt and, in ignorance, to refrain.
    — Claude Bernard
    tags: true  doubt  ignorance 
     
    Put off your imagination, as you put off your overcoat, when you enter the laboratory. Put it on again, as you put on your overcoat, when you leave.
    — Claude Bernard
    tags: imagination 
     
    Hatred is the most clear- sighted, next to genius....
    — Claude Bernard
    tags: hatred  genius 
     
    The investigator should have a robust faith - and yet not believe.
    — Claude Bernard
    tags: believe  faith 
     
    We must alter theory to adapt it to nature, but not nature to adapt it to theory."Ž
    — Claude Bernard
    tags: nature 
     
    Men who believe too firmly in their theories, do not believe enough in the theories of others. So ... these despisers of their fellows ... make experiments only to destroy a theory, instead of to seek the truth.
    — Claude Bernard
    tags: truth  men  believe 
     
    The doubter is a true man of science: he doubts only himself and his interpretations, but he believes in science.
    — Claude Bernard
    tags: men  believe  true  doubt 
     
    Descriptive anatomy is to physiology what geography is to history, and just as it is not enough to know the typography of a country to understand its history, so also it is not enough to know the anatomy of organs to understand their functions.
    — Claude Bernard
    tags: geography 
     
    Art is 'I'; science is 'we'.
    — Claude Bernard
    The goal of scientific physicians in their own science ... is to reduce the indeterminate. Statistics therefore apply only to cases in which the cause of the facts observed is still indeterminate.
    — Claude Bernard
    tags: facts  goal 
     
    The eloquence of a scientist is clarity; scientific truth is always more luminous when its beauty is unadorned than when it is tricked out in the embellishments with which our imagination would seek to clothe it.
    — Claude Bernard
    The better educated we are and the more acquired information we have, the better prepared shall we find our minds for making great and fruitful discoveries.
    — Claude Bernard
    tags: discovery  mind 
     
    A fact in itself is nothing. It is valuable only for the idea attached to it, or for the proof which it furnishes.
    — Claude Bernard
    tags: facts  ideas 
     
    Those who do not know the torment of the unknown cannot have the joy of discovery.
    — Claude Bernard
    tags: joy  discovery 
     
    The science of life is a superb and dazzlingly lighted hall which may be reached only by passing through a long and ghastly kitchen.
    — Claude Bernard
    Man can learn nothing unless he proceeds from the known to the unknown.
    — Claude Bernard
    tags: men  learn 
     
    Science increases our power in proportion as it lowers our pride.
    — Claude Bernard
    tags: power  pride 
     
    The terrain is everything; the germ is nothing,
    — Claude Bernard
    When we meet a fact which contradicts a prevailing theory, we must accept the fact and abandon the theory, even when the theory is supported by great names and generally accepted.
    — Claude Bernard
    tags: facts 
     
    All the vital mechanisms, varied as they are, have only one object, that of preserving constant the conditions of life in the internal environment.
    — Claude Bernard
    tags: environment 
     
    It is what we know already that often prevents us from learning.
    — Claude Bernard
    tags: learning 
     
    Men who have excessive faith in their theories ... make poor observations, because they choose among the results of their experiments only what suits their object, neglecting whatever is unrelated to it and carefully setting aside everything which might tend toward the idea they wish to combat
    — Claude Bernard
    tags: men  wishes  poor  faith  ideas 
     
    Progress is achieved by exchanging our theories for new ones which go further than the old, until we find one based on a larger number of facts. ... Theories are only hypotheses, verified by more or less numerous facts. Those verified by the most facts are the best, but even then they are never final, never to be absolutely believed.
    — Claude Bernard
    tags: progress  facts 
     
    If I had to define life in a single phrase, I should clearly express my thought of throwing into relief one characteristic which, in my opinion, sharply differentiates biological science. I should say: life is creation.
    — Claude Bernard
    In a word, I consider hospitals only as the entrance to scientific medicine; they are the first field of observation which a physician enters; but the true sanctuary of medical science is a laboratory; only there can he seek explanations of life in the normal and pathological states by means of experimental analysis.
    — Claude Bernard
    tags: true 
     
    Il ne fallait jamais faire des expériences pour confirmer ses idées, mais simplement pour les contrôler.We must never make experiments to confirm our ideas, but simply to control them.
    — Claude Bernard
    tags: control  ideas 
     
    The constancy of the internal environment is the condition for free and independent life: the mechanism that makes it possible is that which assured the maintenance, with the internal environment, of all the conditions necessary for the life of the elements.
    — Claude Bernard
    tags: environment 
     
    The great experimental principle, then, is doubt, that philosophic doubt which leaves to the mind its freedom and initiative, and from which the virtues most valuable to investigators in physiology and medicine are derived.
    — Claude Bernard
    tags: freedom  doubt  virtue  medicine  mind 
     
    First causes are outside the realm of science.
    — Claude Bernard
    A contemporary poet has characterized this sense of the personality of art and of the impersonality of science in these words,-'Art is myself; science is ourselves. '
    — Claude Bernard
    In teaching man, experimental science results in lessening his pride more and more by proving to him every day that primary causes, like the objective reality of things, will be hidden from him forever and that he can only know relations.
    — Claude Bernard
    tags: men  reality  forever  teaching  pride 
     
    The joy of discovery is certainly the liveliest that the mind of man can ever feel.
    — Claude Bernard
    tags: men  joy  discovery  mind 
     
    In the philosophic sense, observation shows and experiment teaches.
    — Claude Bernard
    Obervation is a passive science, experimentation is an active science.
    — Claude Bernard
    We must remain, in a word, in an intellectual disposition which seems paradoxical, but which, in my opinion, represents the true mind of the investigator. We must have a robust faith and yet not believe.
    — Claude Bernard
    tags: believe  true  opinion  faith  mind 
     
    Tout est poison, rien n'est poison, tout est une question de dose. Everything is poisonous, nothing is poisonous, it is all a matter of dose.
    — Claude Bernard
    tags: questions 
     
    The stability of the internal medium is a primary condition for the freedom and independence of certain living bodies in relation to the environment surrounding them.
    — Claude Bernard
    [Those] who have an excessive faith in their theories or in their ideas are not only poorly disposed to make discoveries, but they also make very poor observations.
    — Claude Bernard
    tags: discovery  poor  faith  ideas 
     
    Our ideas are only intellectual instruments which we use to break into phenomena; we must change them when they have served their purpose, as we change a blunt lancet that we have used long enough.
    — Claude Bernard
    tags: ideas 
     
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